The Life Of Susie

This is my blog about things I think are interesting. I like books, feminism, home decor, libraries (as I want to be a librarian), movies, TV and fluffy cute animals. I mix my own thoughts in with what I reblog. I hope you enjoy. If you follow me I will be happy to follow back. I also welcome any questions and comments.

Enjoy :)


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Reblogged from disneystheweekenders

disneystheweekenders:

"The dialogue exhibited a level of literacy that might startle those who think that all Saturday-morning cartoonery is brainless; there weren’t many other programs in which one would hear a middle-schooler [Tish] congratulate her comrades by proclaiming “Kudos to us!” Nor was there an abundance of animated series wherein a nervous preteen drama queen [again, Tish] was shepherded through her first appearance by the ghost of William Shakespeare. Particularly pleasing was the series’ depiction of its adult characters - not the anal-retentive, rule-imposing tyrants we’d seen in so many other cartoon weeklies, but instead as recognizable human beings with affectionately detailed personality quirks.
This was precisely what was so unique about the program. The Weekenders was a conscious, symbolic break with the traditions of television animation aimed at “tweens”. It did not attempt to portray any of its characters as stereotypes; instead, it celebrated the uniqueness and intelligence of all its characters, without sacrificing humor in the process. Thanks to the clever writing and directing, and the skilled voice acting behind its four leads (the four performers were never better, particularly Marsden and Soucie), it was an approach that really paid off.”

- Excerpt from America Toons in: A History of Television Animation by David Perlmutter

(via hyenaboy)

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Reblogged from exgynocraticgrrl
Tony Porter: A Call To Men
"Tony is the original visionary and co-founder behind A CALL TO MEN: The National Association of Men and Women Committed to Ending Violence Against Women. He is the author of "Well Meaning Men...Breaking Out of the Man Box - Ending Violence Against Women" and the visionary for the book, NFL Dads Dedicated to Daughters.

Tony's message of accountability is welcome and supported by many grassroots and established organizations. He’s currently working with numerous domestic and sexual violence programs, the National Football League, the National Basketball Association, colleges and universities around the country. He has worked with the United States Military Academy at West Point and the United States Naval Academy at Annapolis.

Tony is an international lecturer for the U.S. State Department having worked in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, United Kingdom and Brazil. In addition, he has been a guest presenter for the United Nations' Commission on the Status of Women and has been a script consultant for Law & Order: Special Victims Unit." - (x)

(Source: exgynocraticgrrl, via boysncroptops)

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Reblogged from fyspringfield
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Reblogged from fromgrapevine

fromgrapevine:

Salvaged decor adds rustic charm to renovated home
With a penchant for DIY projects and an eye for salvaged items, one interior designer is showing homeowners how to take new spaces and fill them with history.

(via mothernaturenetwork)

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Reblogged from gravity-gravity

wow-suchbree-veryblog:

I feel like I need to make my room a little more inspiring. It’s very clean, neat and organized right now but I just need some stuff to tie it together.

(Source: gravity-gravity)

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Reblogged from redefiningbodyimage
A racist woman is not a feminist; she doesn’t care about helping women, just the women who look like her and can buy the same things she can.

A transphobic woman is not a feminist; she is overly concerned with policing the bodies and expressions of others.

A woman against reproductive rights — to use bell hook’s own example, and an issue close to your heart — is not a feminist; she prioritizes her dogma or her disgust over the bodies of others.

An ableist woman is not a feminist; she holds some Platonic ideal of what a physically or mentally “whole” person should be and tries to force the world to fit inside it.
An Open Letter to Caitlin Moran by Nyux  (via boysncroptops)

(Source: redefiningbodyimage, via boysncroptops)

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Reblogged from ollebosse
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Reblogged from forever90s
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Reblogged from ilovecharts

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Reblogged from booklikes
Read as much as you can. Nothing will help you as much as reading.  J. K. Rowling (via booklikes)

(Source: minwynn.booklikes.com, via teachingliteracy)

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Reblogged from eightyfiver
goddammitstacey:

pandanoi:

onorobo:

syntheticmomma:

lupusadlunam:

thechangelingmedusa:
Like seriously, why isn’t pole dancing an olympic sport? This is freakin gymnastics. This is strength and skill. This is not sexual whatsoever. Why does pole dancing have to be so stigmatised as a sexual thing that only strippers do? I have great respect for all people who can pull this off. This is art and beauty right here. 

HEY FUN FACT: pole dancing is known as something strippers do because strippers invented it. And that’s okay! It’s okay to have respect for strippers and the hard work they put into what they do! Let’s stop trying to take the stripper part out of pole dancing so upperclass white girls can do it without being ~stigmatized~ because god forbid women be sexual.

Strippers did not invent poledancing, but that’s okay, too!  Pole dancing is an extremely old sport, early roots can be traced back to the Indian sport, mallakahamba (as early as 1100 AD).  It also existed in China as a performing art prior to the 12th century. 
Strippers dancing around poles, probably got its start in the late 19th century with “hoochie coochie” dances that would be performed in tents. “Little Egypt”, widely attributed as the first striptease pole dancer, was a striptease belly dancer who preformed what they dubbed “exotic dances” in burlesque shows held at the Chicago World’s Fair.  Her dance became so popular, many other erotic dancers began to emulate her performance.
The fact pole dancing is so strongly associated with erotic dancing now is actually a bit incidental! The burlesque shows would be held in tents, and the tents just happened to be propped up by a pole in the center that the woman would dance around! Depression era burlesque shows, held in tents for cost-effectiveness, further solidified the connection between erotic dances, “exotic” dances, and pole dances.  
*note, I don’t approve of the term ‘exotic dance’ to mean ‘bastardized versions of dances from other countries’, this is just the terminology that would have been used, and I think it’s worth noting that erotic dancing is still referred to as exotic dancing, despite the fact they do not share an overlap, and the term ‘exotic’ is, in and of itself, often used rather problematically!

This is even better.

Oh man, see I know what you’re getting at with this, but saying that strippers (or sex workers more accurately) didn’t invent pole dancing is, sorry, just plain wrong.
To attribute the modern pole dancing form seen above to forms like Pole Mallakhamb or Chinese Pole—both historically male dominated pole forms by the way—is not only ridiculous from a technical standpoint (I’ve ranted on this before), it directly contributes to people divorcing pole dancing from its sex work roots and encourages people to ignore the time, dedication and innovation of the women who DID develop it.
Were sex workers the first ones to develop a pole form? No. Were they the ones to develop modern pole dancing seen above? Yes.
Those burlesque performers who took advantage of the tent poles present during their performance invented a form that’s been expanded upon and developed by sex workers for sex workers for decades. Just because the mainstream has finally caught on to how much fun it is doesn’t give anyone the right to rip its history out from under the women who bruised, bled and broke for it.

goddammitstacey:

pandanoi:

onorobo:

syntheticmomma:

lupusadlunam:

thechangelingmedusa:

Like seriously, why isn’t pole dancing an olympic sport? This is freakin gymnastics. This is strength and skill. This is not sexual whatsoever. Why does pole dancing have to be so stigmatised as a sexual thing that only strippers do? I have great respect for all people who can pull this off. This is art and beauty right here. 

HEY FUN FACT: pole dancing is known as something strippers do because strippers invented it. And that’s okay! It’s okay to have respect for strippers and the hard work they put into what they do! Let’s stop trying to take the stripper part out of pole dancing so upperclass white girls can do it without being ~stigmatized~ because god forbid women be sexual.

Strippers did not invent poledancing, but that’s okay, too!  Pole dancing is an extremely old sport, early roots can be traced back to the Indian sport, mallakahamba (as early as 1100 AD).  It also existed in China as a performing art prior to the 12th century. 

Strippers dancing around poles, probably got its start in the late 19th century with “hoochie coochie” dances that would be performed in tents. “Little Egypt”, widely attributed as the first striptease pole dancer, was a striptease belly dancer who preformed what they dubbed “exotic dances” in burlesque shows held at the Chicago World’s Fair.  Her dance became so popular, many other erotic dancers began to emulate her performance.

The fact pole dancing is so strongly associated with erotic dancing now is actually a bit incidental! The burlesque shows would be held in tents, and the tents just happened to be propped up by a pole in the center that the woman would dance around! Depression era burlesque shows, held in tents for cost-effectiveness, further solidified the connection between erotic dances, “exotic” dances, and pole dances.  

*note, I don’t approve of the term ‘exotic dance’ to mean ‘bastardized versions of dances from other countries’, this is just the terminology that would have been used, and I think it’s worth noting that erotic dancing is still referred to as exotic dancing, despite the fact they do not share an overlap, and the term ‘exotic’ is, in and of itself, often used rather problematically!

This is even better.

Oh man, see I know what you’re getting at with this, but saying that strippers (or sex workers more accurately) didn’t invent pole dancing is, sorry, just plain wrong.

To attribute the modern pole dancing form seen above to forms like Pole Mallakhamb or Chinese Pole—both historically male dominated pole forms by the way—is not only ridiculous from a technical standpoint (I’ve ranted on this before), it directly contributes to people divorcing pole dancing from its sex work roots and encourages people to ignore the time, dedication and innovation of the women who DID develop it.

Were sex workers the first ones to develop a pole form? No. Were they the ones to develop modern pole dancing seen above? Yes.

Those burlesque performers who took advantage of the tent poles present during their performance invented a form that’s been expanded upon and developed by sex workers for sex workers for decades. Just because the mainstream has finally caught on to how much fun it is doesn’t give anyone the right to rip its history out from under the women who bruised, bled and broke for it.

(via themonicabird)

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Reblogged from socialworkproblems101
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Reblogged from hollyhocksandtulips
theniftyfifties:

1950s college students

theniftyfifties:

1950s college students

(Source: hollyhocksandtulips)

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Reblogged from patheticjunkies
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Reblogged from stand-up-comic-gifs

stand-up-comic-gifs:

Like fiery eyeball thing, no problem. But don’t even try to imagine a Samoan elf. (x)

(via teamrocketing)