The Life Of Susie

This is my blog about things I think are interesting. I like books, feminism, home decor, libraries (as I want to be a librarian), movies, TV and fluffy cute animals. I mix my own thoughts in with what I reblog. I hope you enjoy. If you follow me I will be happy to follow back. I also welcome any questions and comments.

Enjoy :)


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Reblogged from buzzfeedbooks

buzzfeed:

buzzfeedbooks:

31 Places Bookworms Would Rather Be Right Now

I would like to go to there.

The last one is pretty but books and the steam from the bath don’t really mix..

(via themonicabird)

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Reblogged from mulders
  • Glamour UK: What do you get riled up about in a feminist context?
  • Gillian Anderson: A lot. I have feminist bones and when I hear things or see people react to women in certain ways I have very little tolerance.
  • Glamour UK: But don't you feel sorry for modern men? Not knowing whether they should help us with our bags and open doors for us or whether we'll see it as an affront?
  • Gillian Anderson: No. I don't feel sorry for men.
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Reblogged from u-gotta-kik

(Source: u-gotta-kik, via theslayyer)

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Reblogged from ilovecharts
ilovecharts:

The Impossible Trinity of Creativity

ilovecharts:

The Impossible Trinity of Creativity

(Source: willempirquin, via misswizzle)

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Reblogged from therumpus
For a few months when I was eighteen I was having sex with someone who had faded scars all up and down his arms, small short scars from a knife, maybe a razor blade. I would look at them when he wore t-shirts and I would look at them when we were naked and I wanted to run my fingers along every single one. I touched them a few times, but always lightly, like I didn’t mean it. I don’t know, I thought I’d embarrass him. For a few months when I was nineteen I was having sex with someone with little stretch marks all over his shoulders and chest and stomach and I wanted to stare at them but I tried not to; I wanted to touch them but I was scared to make him feel strange in his body. Later that same year I had sex just once with someone who I met on the bus back home from school, who had straight blond hair and tattoos on his calves and no scars at all on his body. He bought me some beers at the bar out past the mall, then brought me back to his place where he put his hand around my throat and laughed and laughed. I stayed the night anyway, then left his house early in the morning and walked all the way home down Loudon Road and over the river, wondering how close I’d just come to dying, making a list in my head of what the pros and cons would’ve been.

Ungrateful Skin by Claire Comstock-Gay | Two Serious Ladies

A very important melty, hurty, yearnful story by our own Claire Comstock-Gay, who you may better know as Madame Clairevoyant. This is her first published piece of fiction!

(via therumpus)

This is sooooo gooooood I’m so glad I read it. 

(via yeahwriters)

(via yeahwriters)

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Reblogged from victoriousvocabulary
The truth is, everyone likes to look down on someone. If your favorites are all avant-garde writers who throw in Sanskrit and German, you can look down on everyone. If your favorites are all Oprah Book Club books, you can at least look down on mystery readers. Mystery readers have sci-fi readers. Sci-fi can look down on fantasy. And yes, fantasy readers have their own snobbishness. I’ll bet this, though: in a hundred years, people will be writing a lot more dissertations on Harry Potter than on John Updike. Look, Charles Dickens wrote popular fiction. Shakespeare wrote popular fiction - until he wrote his sonnets, desperate to show the literati of his day that he was real artist. Edgar Allan Poe tied himself in knots because no one realized he was a genius. The core of the problem is how we want to define “literature”. The Latin root simply means “letters”. Those letters are either delivered - they connect with an audience - or they don’t. For some, that audience is a few thousand college professors and some critics. For others, its twenty million women desperate for romance in their lives. Those connections happen because the books successfully communicate something real about the human experience. Sure, there are trashy books that do really well, but that’s because there are trashy facets of humanity. What people value in their books - and thus what they count as literature - really tells you more about them than it does about the book.

Brent Weeks (via victoriousvocabulary)

BAM

(via yeahwriters)

(via yeahwriters)

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Reblogged from the-fault-in-our-youtubers

the-fault-in-our-youtubers:

the internet summed up in one gif set

(via danitoast)

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Reblogged from frankoceanvevo

onlyblackgirl:

The history of film in one scene

(Source: frankoceanvevo, via raptor-dance)

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Reblogged from bohemianhomes
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Reblogged from lakilester
lakilester:

No one get’s lynched for exfoliating is the greatest come back I’ve ever witnessed.

lakilester:

No one get’s lynched for exfoliating is the greatest come back I’ve ever witnessed.

(via danitoast)

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Reblogged from foxmouth

foxmouth:

Landscapes, 2014 | by Anthony Samaniego

(via boysncroptops)

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Reblogged from ilovecharts
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Reblogged from teachingliteracy
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Reblogged from fuckyeahsciencefiction
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Reblogged from chloroformkisses